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Kerry Pushes ‘Green’ Agenda for Asia-Pacific Countries

Kerry Pushes ‘Green’ Agenda for Asia-Pacific Countries

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August 14, 2014 (EIRNS)–Secretary of State John “Johnny-Come-Lately” Kerry, who had received a dressing-down in Myanmar for arriving a half-hour late for an offical meeting, was also late for his much-touted address in Hawaii on Asia-Pacific affairs. Kerry was addressing the East-West Center in Honolulu today in a speech entitled entitled “America’s Vision for Asia-Pacific Engagement.” The “vision,” however, would become a “nightmare” for millions of people in the region if ever implemented. Given the fact of the rapidly shrinking Obama Presidency and the emergence of a real development policy launched by China in the form of the “Two Silk Roads,” there is really little fear of that “vision” becoming a reality.

Speaking about how the Asian economies are booming [mainly due to the yet-unmentioned China], he said that the U.S. policy should be to “turn today’s nationalism into economic growth” through the U.S.-backed Trans-Pacific Partnership, which is hitting the shoals in most of the Asian-Pacific nations. Calling it a 21st century agreement, he said that it would unite “shared trade and shared values.” The “value” issue more or less excluding China. This, he indicated, will be what Obama will harp on when he comes to the APEC Summit in November.

Kerry’s second point was “climate change” and it was only here that he first mentioned China, noting that the latest Security and Economic Dialogue meeting between the two countries led to an agreement on reduced carbon emissions. He praised his collaboration earlier with Al Gore and Tim Wirth in the Senate to make the “climate change scenario” a topic of discussion in the Senate, with the invitation to Jim Hansen to describe the “awful results” of neglecting climate change. “If you accept the science, you have to heed what the scientists say is the solution,” Kerry said. Solar and wind was the answer, he added, saying that you “won’t find 19th- and 20th-century solutions” to this problem.

He then focussed on the maritime conflicts in the region, insisting that the U.S. wants a constructive relationship with China.“Obama supports a rising China,” he said, repeating the shibboleth of Administration spokesmen even as they ready their forces for conflict in the region. He said the U.S. will not take sides on the territorial issues, but that the nation’s leaders “care about how these conflicts are resolved,” namely, whether they are based on he principle of “might makes right” or based on “rule of law.” He did say, however, that the U.S. supported the position of the Philippines of taking this issue to arbitration, something China has refused to do, insisting that these issues must be resolved through bilateral negotiations.

He ended with the usual song-and-dance about “human rights. Without mentioning China by name in this matter, he expressed concern about developments in Thailand and in Myanmar. But few are in doubt about who the real target of the “human rights gambit” really is.

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